"I have always been delighted at the prospect of a new day, a fresh try, one more start, with perhaps a bit of magic waiting somewhere behind the morning." ~ J.B. Priestly (1894-1984) English Author


Who am I now?

  • Are you asking yourself “What is parenting?” even after reading all the tips for new moms?
  • Do you feel like you have an empty marriage because of your relationship problems?
  • Are you struggling with empty nest depression, wondering who you are without the children?
  • Have you wondered if a life coach for women is what you’re looking for?

Statue in garden

We often create a story about how our lives are going to be--only to find that it isn’t quite that way. Our youthful storyline didn’t picture relationship problems, miscarriage counseling or disillusionment with our chosen career. We can feel hogtied by routines we formed in search of ease and efficiency. Oftentimes, we are so busy with all the schedules and commitments that we feel drained. After awhile, we might look in the mirror and wonder who we are. Are we the things we do? We’ve cared for others so long that we’ve overlooked tending to ourselves. The perfect lives we imagined have somehow turned into tasks to be done, boxes to check, and possibly an empty marriage. 

Maybe what you’d really want more than anything is to know your authentic self, your dreams, your potential and the contribution you can make in life now. 

As possibilities have opened up for women, where do you fit?

Life has been changing rapidly in our lifetimes, creating more transitional points than ever before. In our mothers’ generation, college was rare for women. Marriage and pregnancy occurred early in life and death arrived earlier too. Most got tips for new moms from their moms as well as what is parenting. 

Today women’s experiences can include:

  • Careers
  • Decisions about pregnancy
  • Miscarriage counseling
  • Frequent moves
  • Family therapy
  • Divorces
  • Remarriages
  • Retirement

It’s so easy to lose your center in the midst of it all. Where is the time for self-reflection? Self-care is smothered underneath it all. You may have quit noticing your own relationship issues, mother-daughter problems, or empty nest depression.

Life transition counseling is a specific way for you to schedule time that is yours for uncovering, nurturing, and remembering what feeds your spirit and brings joy to your life.

Life transition counseling can clarify your new life stage and strengthen your ability to adapt. 

The most prevalent model we have for creating our lives is to set a goal and take action. Nothing’s the matter with that EXCEPT when the goal gets derailed OR you recognize that it’s no longer yours. You suddenly are coping with a miscarriage or living with empty nest syndrome. I acknowledge these unsettling times. There is no rapid answer to any emotional upheaval, whether mother-daughter problems or empty nest depression. In counseling for women, I help you respect today’s discomfort as you chart your new course. Life transition counseling can be a pause button, giving you a breather for setting a course. I’ll encourage you to try on new versions of yourself until you remember the power and strength that are yours.

To remember your own identity can be like a scavenger hunt. I listen to what you already know AND to what your spirit is pushing you to imagine anew. I offer ways for you to see clearly the illusions masquerading as blocks to new possibilities, and to feel the exhilaration of expanding into ways of actually living your personal dreams.

Where we start depends on what particular challenge has made your life so painful, no matter if it is coping with a miscarriage, relationship issues, or empty nest syndrome. I help you to clarify both what seems to be missing in your life and also what you want now. The route to that goal is identifying the steps and taking them only one at a time. Along the way, we bump into beliefs that are limiting and also unveil the bountiful power that you have forgotten about. This is relationship counseling for your inner being.

My own journey

My own life seems to be mostly transitions. I detoured into the airline industry before life as a clinical social worker offering family therapy. Early in my career, my counseling for women included mothers, women struggling with new definitions of femininity, and caregivers for elderly parents. I transitioned from hospital setting to being self-employed. Twenty years ago, cancer refocused my life and career for several years before I returned to recreating a psychotherapy practice. Now I enjoy life-coaching women. 

As women, we are naturally adapting throughout our lives as situations constantly change. While our abilities have been questioned culturally, we have many strong ancestors who belie this small view of ourselves. There are many shoulders for us to stand upon as we pursue what feeds us and what we have to offer.

You may be asking yourself these questions.

Am I being too selfish to focus on myself?

We have not distinguished between self-care and selfishness. Selfishness excludes concern for others. Self-care is keeping you in shape and tuned up. The analogy is the directions given in airplanes. Put your own oxygen mask on first so that you are able to help someone else with theirs. Ultimately, you will both feel good about yourself and also offer more to loved ones or causes that are dear to you. 

Shouldn’t I be satisfied with all the good in my life?

It’s commendable to honor and offer gratitude for all you have in life.  Beyond that, you’re also wired to want to know that you are valuable simply because of who you are. Knowing yourself and where you belong in this world increases your vitality for all life, and your gratitude grows.

How could I not know something so important by this time in my life?

Your spirit has always known who you are and what is important for you to do in this life. This is simply the time to look under the routines and priorities to recover your authentic self—relationship counseling for the various parts of you. We all get distracted, and we must constantly look within to stay in touch with what is important now. Some values maintain lifelong importance; others are temporary like the seasons.

Your transition becomes your future.

Simply call me at (615) 269-4080 for a free 15-minute consultation and ask any questions that come up. If I’m not immediately available, I’ll return your call the same business day. If you’re comfortable with moving forward, we can schedule an initial appointment to see if life transition counseling is right for you.

 

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Testimonials

  • Talking with someone who understands the illness, and being able to express my anxiety, frustration, and resentments helped me a great deal.”
    — R.D., Benton, KY
  • I wanted to express my gratitude for all that you were able to provide over the past several years. I don’t think words can accurately express how valuable it was for me to have a space & a relationship where there were no expectations, where I could truly arrive and share all that I was feeling in the moment, regardless of how difficult or painful those moments may have been.”
    — C.H., Nashville, TN
  • Thank you so much for walking with me on this Journey of discovery.
    — K.G., Brentwood, TN
  • I appreciate all the time you have spent with me, helping me to become the woman I am today. Thank you for sharing your wisdom and insights into life and guiding me through some tough times in my life. …there have been some wonderful women who have walked this journey with me and you are one of them.”
    — M., Nashville, TN
  • My biggest concern was that the intensity of my emotion, sadness, and grief was abnormal and I would have to justify it. When I visited with Peg, I knew that there was no need to worry about that because there was a warmth, understanding and compassion….I understood better that my grieving was a process, and my sadness would get better eventually.
    — C.S., Nashville, TN
  • I would highly recommend Peg and her pet bereavement sessions, to anyone who has, and is, suffering the utter devastation of losing a pet.
    — J.S., Bowling Green, KY

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